You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘horror’ tag.

“They will all abandon you. All you have left is my desire for you.”

I’ve covered a lot of horror movies (and a few books) here, because it seems to be a frequent genre for Girls Underground stories, especially those featuring an adult protagonist (and as I’ve mentioned before, these “girls” often have much darker fates than their younger counterparts, which will be confirmed by this current entry). I’ve profiled some of the classics of the genre, but somehow entirely missed the 1992 original Candyman (a sequel is in the works, which will be especially interesting considering the director Jordan Peele has already made one GU movie), even though it fits perfectly. Doubly negligent on my part since Candyman has long been one of my favorites (can anyone resist Tony Todd’s velvet voice beckoning to “be my victim”?), and I found on a recent re-watch that it has held up well over the years.

Helen is a graduate student studying urban legends, and one night invokes the titular boogeyman as a game, making the crucial mistake that sends her into the otherworld – both in the sense of embroiling her in the history of this phantom killer, and in the sense of stepping into a dangerous crime-ridden housing project, far from familiar territory. Her companion is her fellow thesis-writer, Bernadette. As Helen uncovers the mystery of the Candyman, he begins appearing to her, always causing her to black out and resurface in the midst of some gruesome scene – which then makes her the prime suspect in several murders, leading to her commitment in an institution. He kills her companion too, and her husband betrays her – she is alone. Candyman insists that she must surrender to him willingly, join him, in order to save an innocent child he has kidnapped. He tempts her with immortality. She seems ready to make the bargain, but at the last minute sets him on fire and rescues the child, although she loses her own life in the process. Now Helen has become a Candyman-like figure, able to be summoned in the same manner, ready to wreak bloody vengeance (another Girl Becomes Adversary).

What I noticed in particular this time around was that in its own way, this is all about the Power of Story. What the Candyman wants most – what he thrives on – is belief. The legend must continue, and it was Helen’s work trying to explain it and therefore weaken its power that threatened him. With her final act, she made such an impression on the public that she became a legend herself, therefore gaining the same kinds of powers and his promised immortality.

I recently watched Wildling, directed by Fritz Böhm, and by the end I had concluded that it at least qualifies as an Honorable Mention here.

Anna grows up with a man who is (to us) obviously not her father, who keeps her locked in a room with warnings about the monsters (called Wildlings) that prowl the woods looking to eat small children. When she enters puberty, he gives her drugs to suppress it, making her ill. Eventually, he attempts suicide, but bungles it, ending up in the hospital, and Anna is rescued and fostered by the local sheriff while she acclimates to society. She befriends the sheriff’s younger brother who becomes her companion, and is assisted by a wild man living in the woods. Her adjustment to the world of school and parties is interrupted by disturbing physical symptoms of her transformation into something else (and a new set of instincts that cause her to tear out the throat of a bully who tries to rape her).

Just as Anna is learning more about her origins and true nature, she is suddenly thrown in jail for the bully’s murder. She escapes, and takes off into the wilderness. She is pursued by law enforcement, but more dangerously by a group of wildling hunters, including her so-called “father” (now recovered from his botched suicide attempt and having learned no lessons whatsoever). In a final confrontation, she unleashes her animal self and triumphs over her former captor, free now to fully become the wildling she was meant to be.

I finally got around to watching Jordan Peele’s Us, which was so enthralling that it took me awhile to notice what a perfect Girls Underground story it is (silly of me since the movie begins with some text describing underground passages!). Then while watching some of the special features, I was absolutely thrilled to hear Peele mention “there are several stories involving a woman or a young girl going to this other land that inspired some of the imagery in this movie” and then name-dropping Alice in Wonderland, Wizard of Oz, and the Nutcracker, all Girls Underground examples!

SPOILER ALERT (since it’s impossible to really talk about this film without them).

Adelaide suffered a traumatic, terrifying experience in a funhouse as a child, and this experience starts coming back to her when, as an adult, she goes with her family to the same beach on vacation. Her family is attacked by a group of doppelgangers, led by Adelaide’s double, the Adversary. She fights them along with her husband and children (as companions) until the Adversary kidnaps her child and takes him far underground, where she must go to rescue him and confront her double. However, in a sense this story is what I call a “reverse” GU (where the girl starts out in the otherworld and comes to the “normal” world), because we find out that Adelaide and her double actually switched places as children, so the woman we’ve been viewing as the protagonist was originally from the otherworld and journeyed above, taking over the life of the “real” girl. Which means that the Adversary was herself a Girl Underground in the beginning. It all makes for a very complex, morally ambiguous, and intensely creepy version of the archetype.

“Well, if we have disappeared, can we assume that this place is – somewhere else? Like a horrible sort of Narnia? Not our world at all?”

I devoured Small Spaces by Katherine Arden in a single day, and I think some of the eerie scarecrow imagery seeped into my dreams that night. Weirdly, this just happened to be another book-within-a-book example like the last post.

Ollie (short for Olivia), 11, is set apart by the recent tragic loss of her mother, and her behavior since has only further alienated her from her classmates. One day she comes across a lady about to throw an old book (called, of course, Small Spaces) into a creek and impulsively steals it before it can be destroyed – a decision that seems to doom her but actually is the key to her survival. In this book she reads the apparently true story of a family that was granted a miracle – with a terrible price – by an entity only referred to as the Smiling Man.

The next day she discovers that the school field trip to a local farm intersects with this strange and sinister history lesson. When their bus breaks down and Ollie receives disturbing warnings from both the freakish bus driver and her broken digital watch, she decides to take matters into her own hands and escapes to the forest, with two classmates in tow as unlikely companions. They are quickly surrounded and pursued by animate but voiceless scarecrows all seemingly in thrall to the same Smiling Man, and it appears that they have stumbled into some kind of parallel otherworld (which they amusingly keep calling “Bad Narnia”).

The other students on the bus have been captured by the Adversary, and Ollie must use all her cleverness and bravery (and information from her useful book) to rescue them and make it back home to her own world with her companions. This journey culminates in a dangerous corn maze where she loses her friends, makes a bargain with one of the Adversary’s minions, and eventually uncovers the true identity of the Smiling Man. In the final confrontation, he preys on her deepest desires to tempt her to his side but she stays strong. She exposes a fraud, tricks her Adversary, and uncovers the key to breaking the spell.

51mzgr5m+hl._sl160_Just watched M. Night Shyamalan’s movie Split for the second time, and not sure how I missed it last time (maybe just too mesmerized by McAvoy’s many characters and defaulting to viewing him as the protagonist) but it’s definitely a Girls Underground story as well.

Teenaged Casey, already set apart from her peers due to her childhood trauma, and an orphan, is kidnapped along with two other girls and held underground in a labyrinthine network of tunnels. While it may seem that her kidnapper is her adversary, in a way all of the other personalities are merely minions to the true adversary, the Beast. She is drugged and must fight to remember who she truly is, and the lessons of her past. She is sometimes aided by someone from this otherworld (Hedwig) but cannot trust him. She loses her companions one by one and ultimately must face the Beast alone, equipped with only a boon gifted to her by a wiser, older lady. In the end, while she prevails, she may not want to go home again.

51yh6Ff0uaL._SL160_It’s October, which means I try to watch as many horror movies as possible, and am always searching for decent new ones. The Hollow Child was not excellent – it relied on a lot of tired makeup and special effects and could have benefited from some more compelling young actors – but I did appreciate the reliance on dark fairy folklore.

Sam, is a troubled teenage foster kid living with a family who already has one younger daughter of their own, Olivia. One day Sam neglects her responsibility to walk Olivia home through the woods, and the girl disappears. She returns after a day or so, but something is clearly wrong – well, clearly to Sam at least, although the adults don’t seem to notice anything. Her foster parents are distant at best, blaming her at worst. Sam finds out that there is a strange lady living in the same town with a chillingly similar experience (her own sister disappeared and returned when she was a kid, and she went so far as to burn the house down with the “sister” inside). Of course, everyone just assumes she was and is crazy, but Sam begins to suspect there is more to it. The lady provides some guidance and clues as to the nature of the threat. (I don’t think they ever say the word “fairies” but it is obvious if you know the signs. And later on when the creature emerges, it is angry at humans for destroying nature.)

Along with a male companion she knows from school, Sam begins to piece together what’s going on. She tries to trick the monster who looks like her sister, but manages only to endanger her companion. Her few supporters are dropping like flies. She must track down her real sister in the dark, scary woods, helped only by an apparition of a long-dead girl. Eventually she rescues her sister, exposes the true nature of the creature, and defeats the adversary.

A typical “or did she?” final image, though, implies that she may not have won after all.

Beyond the Walls is a three-part French miniseries (basically the length of a longish movie) that follows the journey of Lisa, an emotionally shut-down woman who inherits a house from a mysterious stranger. This is possibly the best GU story I’ve encountered that takes place entirely inside a house. It is both creepy and emotionally powerful, and I like how Lisa is consistently strong in spirit, unable to be swayed by fear or temptation.

After hearing weird noises coming from inside the walls, she smashes through and finds herself in a labyrinthine, windowless, endless house – mostly empty but for the occasional terrifying once-human monsters called Others. She eventually runs into a single companion, Julian, who has been stuck in the house for years – though for him, it’s 100 years ago (time is strange in the house). It becomes apparent that those who end up in the house are struggling with some kind of deep guilt, and if they can’t face it they eventually become the Others. After many trials, Lisa finds a door that leads to a forest (though still, somehow, inside the house) and is reunited with the little sister she lost (partly due to her own negligence), who is living in a cottage by a lake with a mysterious older woman named Rose. It is always day there, always pleasant, and both Rose and her sister want her to stay there forever. But Lisa is not fooled by this charade and eventually finds her way back into the house proper to search for Julian, who she became separated from in the forest. They fall in love but realize they could only be together if they stayed there. Instead, they decide to pursue a return to the outside world, and venture down, down, down to the basement where a giant vortex-like hole leads to parts unknown. Rose reappears to try to tempt Lisa into staying, but instead she makes a leap of faith.

It’s hard to talk about And the Trees Crept In by Dawn Kurtagich, especially in regards to whether or not it’s a Girls Underground story, without entirely spoiling it, which I don’t want to do – this one is worth reading without any preconceptions. It’s a wonderfully gothic, disturbing, claustrophobic tale told in creative ways, that actually creeped me out in places (not easy to do, I’m getting more jaded to horror as I grow older).

Silla, who starts the story at 14, escapes her abusive father with her 4-year old sister in tow, and shows up on the door of her aunt’s crumbling mansion. But what she doesn’t know is that her aunt has a childhood secret that may threaten them all, involving the summoning of a dark spirit they call the Creeper Man. When her aunt goes mad and retreats to the attic, and the forest outside begins to edge ever closer to the house, cutting them off from any outside help (or food), Silla must battle her own inner demons to rescue herself and her sister. Her only companion is a mysterious boy who comes and goes, and may not be what he seems.

This is one of those GU sub-types that entirely takes place in a house (even when that house slowly becomes part of a forest), and uses that very effectively. When the final confrontation with the adversary comes, everything is turned on its head – but even though it takes an unusual approach to the archetype, I think it still fits. Also, this is a nice twist on the general trend for GU books to be YA fantasy and GU movies to be adult horror, since this is a YA horror book.

dreammaster

After recently re-watching New Nightmare, I thought I might re-visit some of the other installments of the Nightmare on Elm Street franchise, and ended up on 4: The Dream Master. Terrible movie, really, but what’s interesting from a Girls Underground perspective… the main character is named Alice. Now, I’ve noticed over time that Alice in Wonderland references pop up in a lot of GU examples. In this case, it’s not just the name – Alice is a pretty solid GU (no mother, useless father, trying to save friends and brother, faces adversary alone, etc.), but more importantly, she enters the otherworld through a mirror. And in fact, manages to defeat Freddy by showing him his reflection in a mirror. I always wonder if these allusions to Alice are intentional on the part of writers with GU stories.

dreammaster2

61MWiQ9VnEL._SL160_The Final Girls is probably just an Honorable Mention as far as the GU archetype goes, but worth mentioning, as it cleverly references the old slasher movies that are often themselves Girls Underground stories. I will also note that early on, there is a mention of the Persephone myth, and GU examples often will reference other GU stories (most often Alice, but sometimes older myths and fairytales).

Max loses her mother in a car crash, and years later tries to connect with her memory by going to see a showing of the movie that made her momentarily famous, an 80’s slasher film called Camp Bloodbath. Max and her friends get magically transported into the world of the movie, complete with killer on the loose, and Max finds herself trying to rescue her “mother” (really the character played by her mother). They become the “final girls” once all of Max’s friends and the other characters are killed off. But it is only when her mother sacrifices herself that Max gains the power to defeat the adversary – which somehow magically rescues all her friends and sends them home…. or so it seems.

An exploration of story…

In which I describe examples of the Girls Underground archetype that I have discovered in literature and film. For more information regarding the concept, including its earlier incarnations in fairytales and mythology, visit the pages linked above. Here is a list of all the examples I have covered thus far.

The Oracle


THE GIRLS UNDERGROUND STORY ORACLE - tapping into the Power of Story for guidance and insight. Learn more here.

Alice Days

Celebrate one of the primary inspirations for Girls Underground - Alice in Wonderland - with a holiday down the rabbit hole and through the looking glass! Check out the Alice Days page for party ideas, movie recommendations, and more.

Visits

  • 74,599 journeys underground

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 169 other followers

Follow on WordPress.com

Updates from Bird Spirit Land