You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Honorable Mentions’ category.

Dig Two Graves was unfortunately less creepy and supernatural than the trailer made it seem, but nonetheless it’s at least an Honorable Mention as a Girls Underground story.

Jake, a young teenage girl, loses her brother when they decide to jump off a high cliff into a quarry, and she hesitates at the last minute – he jumps without her, and disappears into the water forever. Her parents seem to quickly move on, distracted by a new baby on the way, so it is up to Jake to seek a way to get her brother back from the dead. One day she is approached by some strange, anachronistically-dressed men (led by one who might be called the adversary) at the entrance to a tunnel, who promise they can bring her brother back, provided someone is sacrificed in his place. She then must decide if she can bear to push a school friend off the cliff.

Like Forbidden Game, it turns out that a lot of what is going on had its start with something her grandfather was involved in many years before, coming back to haunt them all. Unfortunately as far as the GU archetype goes, it is largely the grandfather and not Jake who deals with, and ultimately defeats, the adversary.

The Giant Under the Snow by John Gordon is another great children’s fantasy book from the late 60’s, like The Gruesome Green Witch and A Walk Out of the World, albeit only an Honorable Mention as far as the GU archetype goes.

Jonk (short for Jonquil, one of the more interesting GU names I’ve come across) wanders off from a school trip in the “backlands” one day and stumbles across a strange artifact and a Green Man figure embedded in the landscape. She is chased by a black dog and rescued by a mysterious woman named Elizabeth. Jonk and her two male companions learn more about the legend of the Green Man and are pursued by terrifying leather-skinned men when they seek out Elizabeth, who tells them the story of an ancient fight against an evil warlord who is trying to rise again. Jonk and her friends must hide the artifact from the adversary, but at least they get one big perk – magical devices from Elizabeth that allow them to fly! In the end, Jonk does end up facing off against the warlord one on one and thwarts his return.

Technically, I suppose this book fulfills many of the key plot points of a Girls Underground story, but ultimately something feels missing and it doesn’t quite fit the classic pattern. Perhaps it’s the lack of any meaningful interaction between Jonk and the adversary (he never even gets a chance to speak), the absence of a transition into another world, and her normal home life.

I just had a chance to watch the independent film American Fable, and while it’s not quite the classic GU story, it hits enough points (and the general tone) to warrant an Honorable Mention here. It is perhaps a less fantastical Pan’s Labyrinth, or a less grim Tideland, both of which have been covered here previously, and both of which feature an innocent and story-obsessed girl caught up in the harsh world of adults. The fantasy and dreamlike elements could have been turned up a notch in my opinion, though they were very well done.

11 year old Gitty lives with her family on their farm, her only friend a beloved chicken. While she is close with her father, her parents are both nonetheless distracted by the possibility of losing their farm, and some other intrigue she doesn’t understand. One day Gitty stumbles upon a man who appears to be being held prisoner in their old grain silo – although she intuits that her family has something to do with it, she eventually befriends the man, even going so far as to descend into the silo to spend time with him (not quite underground, but a journey down at least). In a way, everyone is a potential adversary for Gitty – the man himself, who turns out to be a threat to her family, her own parents who are hiding things from her, the strange woman they seem to be colluding with, and possibly most of all her older brother, who ends up in a final, violent confrontation with her when he discovers she’s been fraternizing with the enemy. The imprisoned man could also be seen as her companion, and/or the one she is trying to rescue in classic GU style.

Gitty sees the world through the lens of stories (The Power of Story), making sense of what she experiences by relating it to the tales she knows well. And so what is on the one hand a mundane situation – a farm being threatened by economic failure and the response of desperate people – becomes a fairy tale from a different angle, surreal and moving in its telling.

51t3lj1pz-l-_sl160_I was excited for The Door by Andy Marino because the title so nicely alludes to “portal” part of Portal-Quest Fantasy (of which Girls Underground is an example), however it turned out to only be an Honorable Mention and – while interesting and ambitious – was ultimately disappointing.

Hannah, 12, lives with her widowed mother next to a remote lighthouse. Her inner world is complex and somewhat dysfunctional, in that she talks to people in her head and is crippled by certain OCD tendencies (which was an interesting and unique aspect for a protagonist, though it’s not fully explored). One day strangers visit, and events compel her mother to reveal that their family has a sacred duty – they guard the door to the city of the dead, a vast otherworld where all souls go after death. When her mother is murdered, Hannah goes through the forbidden door to rescue her.

In the city of the dead, Hannah’s “imaginary” inner people materialize before her, and become her companions, along with a couple dead souls who help her. She must avoid the ominous Watchers who patrol the city, and she has conflict with those who have betrayed her – but there is never really a firm Adversary working against her. She does start to forget herself, and the details of her life (a consequence of being in the land of the dead) but that is remedied. The city and its inhabitants are creatively imagined and described, but that’s not quite enough to sustain the book.

While Hannah manages to find her mother, and even her long lost father, and there are some tantalizing hints that she’s been to this otherworld before somehow, nothing is explained in the end, her final test is rather anticlimactic, and the resolution is vague and unsatisfying.

511pZqCjfWL._SL160_The Near Witch by Victoria Schwab is really only an Honorable Mention as far as the GU archetype goes, but well worth reading.

Teenager Lexi lives in a small village named Near (in some undefined time that includes rifles but not cars or modern technology) that appears to be very closed off to outside influences. There’s a story in Near of a witch who lived long ago, who was accused of killing a child and murdered in retaliation. History has become indistinguishable from legend at this point, but Lexi begins to suspect the Near witch is real, and not gone after all, when children begin disappearing from the village.

Unfortunately, the locals fixate on the stranger who has recently showed up, an enigmatic boy that Lexi names Cole (because he won’t divulge his real name), and who becomes her companion as she tries to discover the truth behind the missing children, while protecting her own little sister Wren from joining them (and, eventually, protecting Cole from the villagers). She is helped (and sometimes hindered) along the way by two elderly sisters that were once powerful witches, and may still have some magic left in them. As time runs out she must find the old witch’s bones to put her to rest, which involves entering a haunted wood and battling the witch’s spirit and her crows. (A sort of secondary adversary is Lexi’s uncle, who is one of the village elders and leads the hunt for Cole, refusing to listen to Lexi’s protestations.)

Lexi does defeat the Near witch, and saves her sister, but only with Cole’s help. There is not much interaction with the adversary until the very end, and there’s no big journey or otherworldly exploration. She does have absent parents, though, in that her father is dead and her mother has sort of faded due to grief. And the adversary does try to trick her at the last moment.

61MWiQ9VnEL._SL160_The Final Girls is probably just an Honorable Mention as far as the GU archetype goes, but worth mentioning, as it cleverly references the old slasher movies that are often themselves Girls Underground stories. I will also note that early on, there is a mention of the Persephone myth, and GU examples often will reference other GU stories (most often Alice, but sometimes older myths and fairytales).

Max loses her mother in a car crash, and years later tries to connect with her memory by going to see a showing of the movie that made her momentarily famous, an 80’s slasher film called Camp Bloodbath. Max and her friends get magically transported into the world of the movie, complete with killer on the loose, and Max finds herself trying to rescue her “mother” (really the character played by her mother). They become the “final girls” once all of Max’s friends and the other characters are killed off. But it is only when her mother sacrifices herself that Max gains the power to defeat the adversary – which somehow magically rescues all her friends and sends them home…. or so it seems.

51u68zdhqQL._SL160_At the Devil’s Door is a fairly mediocre horror movie but with an honorable-mention level GU plot. You might think that the first character you meet, a teenage girl, is the Girl Underground, but it’s a bit more complicated. This girl is tricked into letting the devil take over her body, but the adversary hardly stops there.

Fast forward a couple decades, and there’s a real estate agent showing a house, when she sees the first girl in the hallway, and thinks it’s the missing daughter of the house’s owners. After finding out that the girl she’s seen is actually the first girl, the one who supposedly committed suicide in the house in the 80’s, the real estate agent confronts the devil-possessed girl and is killed. Another potential Girl bites the dust.

The real Girl Underground here is the agent’s sister Vera, who begins to uncover the story behind these events. She finds out that Hannah (the first girl) was pregnant when she died, although a virgin. Apparently the devil has been trying to bring forth a supernatural child to inhabit. Vera confronts the devil but is thrown out a window and goes into a coma for eight months, after which she discovers she is about to give birth to a baby. Vera is understandably freaked out, and gives the baby up for adoption.

Six years later, Vera decides to find her daughter, presumably possessed by the devil, and kill her. She confronts the little girl, who technically doesn’t confirm anything but acts creepy enough that you know she’s right. But Vera cannot bring herself to kill her, and so she takes the girl with her instead. This suggests another “girl loses” version of the archetype, which seems to mostly be present in the horror genre.

51nVwl5yBWL._SL160_Raven Speak by Diane Lee Wilson is set in ancient Norway, during a winter with no end. Asa’s clan is dying of disease and starvation. Her father, the chieftain, has sailed off in search of food, and her mother is almost dead, so it is up to her to save her people. But she is opposed by the evil clan skald, Jorgen, who seeks power for himself.

When Jorgen attacks Asa and her beloved horse, they flee along the fjords until they meet an old wisewoman. Asa cannot tell if Wenda is ultimately her friend or another foe, for the one-eyed woman is strange and moody, and she speaks to two ravens as if they were people. But eventually, she decides to leave Wenda’s cave and return to her clan to face her adversary. They have a violent altercation, but Asa’s triumph is not the end of her troubles, for a much worse ordeal lays ahead, and a sacrifice she must make for the well-being of her clan.

Not perhaps a true GU story, as she doesn’t journey far, the adversary is almost a tangential plotline, and her non-talking horse is her only companion, but a gripping book with a strong heroine that is worth reading.

41QC-u7HTUL._SL160_I just watched Mr. Frost for the first time – somehow I missed this 1990 gem with Jeff Goldblum, who I love, and had to track it down on Youtube. Partway through it occurred to me that it was probably a GU story (which it is, although I’m only considering it an Honorable Mention since it’s missing a lot of the finer details).

Mr. Frost is clearly the adversary, a man who may or may not be the devil himself. He volunteers a confession to some brutal murders but then immediately falls silent, and is eventually put in a mental asylum, where he meets Dr. Sarah Day. Frost will only speak to Day, and tells her that he plans to goad her into killing him. She treats him like a mental patient, obviously, even though the detective who arrested him (her companion in this sense) keeps warning her that Frost is truly evil.

After several displays of his power, Day is gradually convinced that Frost is indeed the devil and that she must murder him to save others. But when she does, it appears to open the door in turn for her to become possessed by the devil. While she “wins” in the sense of defeating the adversary, she ultimately loses – like some other thriller/horror GU stories, such as The DarkIn Dreams and Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark.

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“Believing in yourself and your magic is half the battle.”

I picked up The Courage of Cat Campbell by Natasha Lowe figuring it might be a GU book because of the genre (intermediate fantasy) combined with the girl’s name in the title, and I was right. This is pretty light fare, with an adversary that is rather easily defeated – it’s mostly about learning to believe in yourself, which while somewhat cliché, is definitely a common GU theme.

Cat, who I think is 11 or 12, lives in a world where some people are natural witches, and the lucky ones go to train at a special witch school. Cat has always wanted this destiny, but did not appear to have inherited the gift from her witchy mother (who due to past events hates all magic). One day she discovers that she is a Late Bloomer and has powers after all, but she cannot control them well. Rejected by the school, and told by her mother to forget about becoming a witch, Cat sets out to prove herself in a dangerous way. A notoriously evil witch has escaped prison and Cat decides to capture her, with a little help from her companion Peter (who briefly gets turned into a guinea pig for his troubles).

SPOILERS Amazingly, it works, and Cat discovers that the evil witch was just sad all along, forced to be a witch when she wanted to be a singer, which created so much rage she hurt people. The “adversary” is willingly taken back to jail, but happy now, Cat’s mother comes around to her daughter’s new destiny, and Cat gets into the school and makes a life for herself as a witch, happily ever after.

“Don’t let fear stand in your way.”

“The traffic flow from folklore to fiction and film has always been heavy.” - Maria Tatar, Secrets Beyond the Door

An exploration of story…

In which I describe examples of the Girls Underground archetype that I have discovered in literature and film. For more information regarding the concept, including its earlier incarnations in fairytales and mythology, visit the pages linked above. Here is a list of all the examples I have covered thus far.

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Alice Days

Celebrate one of the primary inspirations for Girls Underground - Alice in Wonderland - with a holiday down the rabbit hole and through the looking glass! Check out the Alice Days page for party ideas, movie recommendations, and more.

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