The new movie Gretel & Hansel is, of course, based on the fairytale, but as the re-ordering of the name shows, it places Gretel in a more prominent position and ends up being more of a GU example by far than the original tale.

Teenaged Gretel and her younger brother Hansel are cast out by their half-mad mother (their father already dead), and set off into the forest. Along the way they eat some mushrooms* and spend some time without cares. In the search for a means of survival, they end up at the house of a strange old woman (Holda, a name taken from another German fairytale) whose table is always mysteriously laid with abundant food. They decide to stay with her for a while, and Gretel becomes a sort of apprentice in herbcraft and other arts, while Holda begins to reveal that they are more alike than expected, and encourages Gretel to embrace her inner witch (therefore adding a “temptation by the Adversary” element). But when Hansel goes missing, Gretel rejects everything in favor of saving him (and ends up saving the souls of other lost children as well). She discovers Holda’s true nature, along with the truth about that food she’s been eating (it’s not good news). She defeats the witch, but in the end she may be becoming an adversary herself after all.

While I loved the visuals and a few of the ideas, ultimately I found this movie to be disappointing – a rather weird backstory that didn’t make much sense to me, an off-putting voiceover by Gretel now and then, and too much style over substance. But, I find it fascinating that when people elaborate on the older stories that formed the foundation of the GU archetype, they end up adding elements to make them more fully part of that archetype, possibly without even realizing it.

*The mushrooms, of course, are fly agaric, although they are strangely unrealistic in their appearance. Like so many other media representations, however, this one fails to accurately portray anything about such mushrooms, including how they must be prepared to become psychoactive and not just nauseating (pro tip – do not eat them raw!). For more about fly agaric, see my blog Raven’s Bread.