How could I resist picking up a copy of Time of the Witch by Mary Downing Hahn? I spied it in a library sale (one dollar!) in all its 80s teen supernatural pulp fiction glory, complete with wonderful cover illustration. I wasn’t expecting much, and I was right, but it was a fun diversion for a couple hours.

12 year old Laura has just been dumped at her aunt’s house in the boonies for a whole summer, with her little brother, so that their distracted, soon-to-be-divorced mother can focus on getting back into school and the workforce. The only interesting part of this very small town is Maude, an old woman with a pet crow who may just be a real witch. Despite the misgivings of everyone around, including her new friend Wanda, Laura decides to approach Maude for help – she wants to get her parents back together. But it turns out that Maude has a complicated backstory with Laura’s family, and her motivations are not what they seem. Laura gets what she wishes for in the most horrible way, and then must race against the clock to undo it – and to save her brother, who has been caught in the web. She enlists the help of a former magical student of Maude’s who is now more of a “white light” sort of practitioner. Unfortunately, this means that in the final showdown, Laura herself only plays a supporting role and doesn’t really defeat the Adversary all by herself. She does, however, learn a valuable growing-up sort of lesson about the way of the world, which is typical for these versions of the archetype.