“She felt out of place and out of time, as though a great force had ripped her away from everything she knew and deposited her, dizzy and breathless, on a strange mountaintop. Even her mother was unfamiliar to her. For the first time in her life, she felt completely alone.”

I picked up Lily by Michael Thomas Ford hoping it would be a case of a titular girl GU story, and I was right! On top of that, it was an excellent read, with a truly unique style and protagonist, and the best Baba Yaga character I think I’ve ever read (so many authors try to mitigate her bloodthirstiness and amorality but not this one).

Lily, 13, finds upon puberty that she can tell how someone will die just by touching them – a special power that causes her nothing but grief, especially after she sees, but cannot stop, her father’s impending death. Her mother immediately retreats from her and becomes distant, yet still forces Lily to come with her and abandon their secluded, magical village to enter the mundane world. They soon come upon a religious tent revival show (run more like a carnival, and written with no love for a certain type of crass Christianity, which I appreciated), and Lily soon finds herself bound to use her power as a sideshow act for the Adversary, a preacher who has also set his sights on her mother. She initially falls for his lies that doing this will help rid herself of her curse. In the meantime, she befriends a changeling, and falls in love with a girl who is held captive by the Adversary, thus adding a quest of rescue to her tasks. All throughout these ordeals, she is shadowed by Baba Yaga, who she has met once in the dream world, and who takes a special interest in her – though one never knows if that will be to her benefit or detriment.

Lily doesn’t quite defeat the Adversary on her own, but she does return home with her true love, and has one final confrontation with Baba Yaga in the form of a riddle game which she wins (sort of by accident). Still, there are enough elements here to qualify this as a solid Girls Underground story. And it stands out among the rest in many ways, including the amazing illustrations by Staven Andersen.