“Unfortunately, confusing and crazy ordeals are often the only way to get to the bottom of incomprehensible things.”

I really wanted to like The Land of Yesterday by K. A. Reynolds more than I did. I picked it up because the cover is one of the most Girls Underground I have seen – a girl literally falling! – and some initial reviews I saw were enthusiastic. But ultimately, while the emotional issues it tackled were meaningful, the writing and world-building were a bit too “clever” for my tastes, without ever really pulling me in. The one thing I really did love was the idea of a house being the adversary – often a GU story takes place entirely within a house, but I can’t recall one ever being such a prominent character before.

Cecelia, 11, made a tragic mistake that resulted in her little brother’s death. Since then, the magical, animate house she inhabits has turned against her. Her mother disappears one day in search of her brother’s spirit in the far off Land of Yesterday (actually another planet), and the house pushes Cecelia to follow her, threatening to destroy her father if her mother is not returned to it. She uses a magical pen filled with her own tears to open a literal door within herself. Despite her brother’s spirit’s warnings, she takes off on a perilous quest. She soon meets two gnomes who run a shuttle service between the worlds, who become her companions. Once she reaches Yesterday, she finds her mother but due to the powers of that world of the dead, begins to forget why she’s there. She must see through illusions and fight to rescue those she holds dear. Eventually she leaves her companions behind, and must face off against her angry house alone (uncovering an old secret in the process) in order to win back both her parents and get back home.

“Sometimes all you can do is trust you’ll find your way home.”