“Ordinary life had been infected by an otherworldly menace that had struck down Finn’s friends with terrifying ruthlessness and left Finn alone. Alone, she planned a rescue.”

Thorn Jack by Katherine Harbour is a pretty standard “dark faerie” take on the Girls Underground trope, which I felt was rather uneven. There was definitely some magic in this, and a good dose of folklore, but it got bogged down at times by endless descriptions of the characters’ outfits and repetitive imagery – it would have benefited from a better editor (and proofreader, since a publisher’s mistake replaced every instance of the word “ivy” with the name “Emory”… and there were a lot of mentions of ivy, including on the very first page! Hard to understand how they all missed that).

Finn, who lost her mother and more recently her sister, moves with her father to a new town to attend college there – a town which turns out to be half populated by relatively malevolent fairy folk. She immediately falls for Jack before she knows what he is, and spends most of the novel trying to rescue him from the clutches of their dark queen Reiko (the Adversary). Finn’s friends are eventually collateral damage in this struggle, and then she must save them too. She discovers along the way that she has an ancestral connection to all of this. At one point, she forgets everything that has happened, and must remember in order to move forward. In the end, she is the one who may be sacrificed, and Reiko attempts to seduce her to their side, but she prevails – unfortunately not entirely on her own, which I always feel detracts from the climax of a GU story.

I see that the third book in this series (of which this is the first) has Finn journeying to the land of the dead, in keeping with the katabasis theme of the archetype, but not sure I’m invested enough in the books to get there.