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“What she didn’t know was that adventures are never neat little affairs like a trip to the amusement park, from which you emerge tired but unaltered. They are messy. They are dangerous. They are hungry, and what they take from you can never be recovered.”

The Key & the Flame by Claire M. Caterer unfortunately just didn’t ever really engage me in all of its 470 pages. It was a relatively by-the-book Girls Underground story, though. Holly, 11, has a boring life and yearns for adventure. Her family moves to England for a few months in the summer, and their house’s caretaker gives Holly a mysterious key which opens a door in a tree into another world. Holly is accompanied by her little brother Ben and their neighbor Everett, both of whom get captured immediately, and Holly must find a way to rescue them and return them all home.

She is helped along the way by several magical creatures from that realm, who are hoping she can help them in return, to fight against the anti-magic royalty. Theoretically the prince is the adversary, although a greater, evil adversary is hinted at – but Holly only interacts with him at the very end, and even then it’s more of an escape than a true confrontation or defeat. She does have a partial betrayal by a companion, and distracted parents, and the risk of losing herself, and guidance from an old wise woman. But even Holly seems to know at the end that, even with all her adventures, she didn’t really accomplish anything in that otherworld – she may have even caused more harm than good to the magical creatures there. So it wasn’t a particularly satisfying end for a Girl Underground.

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